Delivering Research into Production—A Design Approach

Susan Turner, Bailey Edward

The Institute for Bio-processing Research Laboratory project is a new University building attached to an existing Agricultural College of Engineering building, providing a combination of wet labs and dry labs, offices and classroom spaces. What is programmatically unique is the need for extremely flexible large high-bay and hazardous spaces for converting cellulostic material to energy sources, which will be used by both University researchers, and by private entities for scale-able proof of concept. It will have a state of the art device which is only one of three in the world. The requirements for both the program and this particular machine required extensive coordination with the users and authorities having jurisdiction.

The intent of the physical space is to accommodate both bench scale research and larger scale proof-of-scale research space, such that the commercial applications can be vetted. There is a demand for medium scale research facilities, which can provide proof of concept, as long as they are ultimately flexible. The ability of the private sector to use the high bay space provides them a intermittent use of a space for proof of concept, potential involvement of students for employment, and affordable access to complex expensive equipment. From the University perspective, it provides both a revenue stream from the rental of the space(s) for the upkeep and advancement of the facility and research, private sector input to the bench scale research, involvement of students in private sector for real life experience (and potential future employment) as well as naming opportunities in the facility. The ultimate goal, however, is to deliver the research to the market at a cutting edge speed.

The presentation will discuss the planning constraints of advanced energy distillation technology, and its impact on integrated services design, code requirements, and spatial relationships, through design into construction. The focus will be on design resolution of conflicting demands for confidentiality in private sector research and while maintaining the University ideal of collegial interaction and collaboration. Finally the methodologies for flexibility in use and services to accommodate levels of privacy, security, collaboration, service use, and cost allocation.

The presentation will be provided through the view of the architect, with input (but not presence) from the Owner.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the planning constraints of advanced energy distillation technology, and its impact of integrated services design.
  • Understand options for providing ultimate flexibility for the laboratory design balanced by cost control and balanced budgets.
  • Understand the conflicting demands for confidentiality in private sector research and while maintaining the University ideal of collegial interaction and collaboration.
  • Understand methodologies for flexible levels of privacy, security, balanced with collaboration.

Biography:

Susan Turner is a licensed Architect with 30 years' experience in delivering integrated buildings and renovations. She is a Research Design Specialist with Bailey Edward, and acts as their laboratory designer and technical resource for construction details, specifications and quality review for laboratory projects. She is a Director of the Windy City I2SL chapter. She has her PMP, and has worked practiced, published and lectured in Canada, USA, England, Germany and China.

 

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