Maturity Matrices Applied to High Performance Laboratories

Allen Doyle, University of California, Davis

Ventilation management can be carried out by a few key stakeholders responding to service calls and deferred maintenance, or it can be an integrated combination of efforts between safety, facilities, researchers and capital planning. High performance buildings need alignment from all stakeholders and sophisticated planning, which can be assessed by Maturity Matrices. They are management tools, now adapted for the Smart Lab Accelerator program. They are already used in IT, risk management, procurement, and the retail sector and they fit I2SL goals for continuous improvement. This session features three members of the Smart Lab Accelerator: Maturity Matrix (SLAMM) development team for an interactive demonstration that was very popular in 2016. Brief explanations will then shift to a hands-on demonstration. This year we will focus on Ventilation Management.

For several years, an I2SL development team coordinated by Allen Doyle developed a process and content that identifies opportunities for improving energy and environmental performance of laboratories. The process is a self-assessment that allows stakeholders such as maintenance, safety, capital planning and researchers to better understand their interdependent roles, how to work in unison, and identify steps for improved performance and cost reductions while ensuring health and safety. The presentation will cover the history of development and describe the breadth of SLAMM.

Biography:

After 20 years of ocean chemistry, soil, and permafrost research, the urgency of climate disruption and environmental degradation compelled Allen Doyle to leave the lab and work with scientists on conservation in their workplace. Mr. Doyle brings an occupant focus to laboratory energy conservation, as he is co-founder of LabRATS, developing a ten-module green laboratory program, a moderator of the Labs21 Energy-Efficient Laboratory Equipment Wiki, organizer of 100+ member national network, working to reduce plug load through cold storage management and the Freezer Challenge contest, and engaged in HVAC optimization through temperature relaxation and control banding. As sustainability manager, he interacts at all levels of campus and hopes that research laboratories and their stakeholders will reach ambitious standards of quality with dramatic improvements in resource consumption. He collaborates campuses across the country, federal agencies as U.S. Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and private sector laboratories, and he serves on two steering committees in I2SL. An avid trail runner, his meditation comes in the form of a rapid descent down a mountain.

 

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