A Guide to Navigating Building and Fire Codes for Laboratories

May 21, 2015
1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Eastern Daylight Time

 

Chemistry laboratory ventilation should maintain acceptable air quality for occupants, indoor temperatures, and desired pressure differentials between building spaces, and prevent fires and explosions. Because the process involves moving and conditioning large volumes of air, ventilation systems are often the most energy intensive systems in a lab.

Recent changes in lab ventilation technologies have created new opportunities for conserving energy while maintaining a safe work environment. "A Guide to Navigating Building and Fire Codes for Laboratories," recently prepared by the Laboratory Technology Solutions Team for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)s Better Buildings Alliance, provides an overview of these opportunities and how they are related to building and fire codes generally used in the United States.

During this webinar, Craig Wray of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will share details on how the guide addresses safety and energy issues related to chemistry-driven lab ventilation, provides an overview of current codes and standards related to lab ventilation rates, and describes lab ventilation systems and opportunities to reduce related airflows.

The presenter will:

  • Identify ventilation-related safety and energy issues in chemistry labs.
  • Summarize U.S. codes and standards related to lab ventilation.
  • Describe lab ventilation systems and opportunities to reduce related airflows.
  • Discuss how to enable airflow reductions using demand-based and optimized ventilation.

Registration

Sign up to view the recording.

I2SL Members and IFMA Research and Development Council Members can register for free! Visit the Member Portal or check with your IFMA member coordinator for additional instructions.

Professional Development Hours and Continuing Education Credits

Webinar attendees and those who view the recording can earn one Professional Development Hour (PDH) for professional engineers or one Learning Unit (LU) from the American Institute of Architects for registered architects.

Contact I2SL after the webinar if you would like to receive a credit for your participation.

Instructor Biography

Craig Wray has more than 30 years of experience as a consulting engineer and scientist addressing energy, airflow, pollutant transport, and commissioning issues in buildings. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, his current efforts focus on air-handling system experiments, modeling these systems and their interactions with building components, developing related diagnostic methods, and assessing the benefits and risks of improvements. He leads the Laboratory Technology Solutions Team for DOEs Better Buildings Alliance.

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