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The Role of Building Management Systems in Sustainable Design

David Franczak and Robert Rosa, Engineered Energy Systems, Inc.

The proper selection and installation of building management systems (BMS) can lead to substantial energy and operational savings in a laboratory facility. An emerging trend is that the FDA is looking more closely at the laboratory environment as part of the overall manufacturing of a product. As a result, HVAC controls are required to be qualified under the GAMP format. The term QBMS or Qualified Building Management System, is becoming more important in the pharmaceutical industry.

The presentation will focus on the current trends of QBMS installations including COD (critical operational data), control system design, commissioning, CSV (computer system validation), installation, maintenance, and operations. The goal of the presentation is to show that the environmental conditions in a laboratory and pharmaceutical facility must be treated as a process. Other processes require upfront engineering and design documents to meet the GAMP format. If this is applied to HVAC systems and their associated controls, then there is a greater potential for life cycle cost savings and energy reduction. The current mindset is to use traditional Direct Digital Controls (DDC) on HVAC systems. We intend to show how the use of programmable logic controller (PLC) based controls will lead to a more sustainable approach and create greater energy efficiency. The inherent up front costs will be highlighted and the overall life cycle cost will be examined in greater detail.

The lessons learned in a current installation will be examined along with their approach to HVAC design and controls implementation.

Labs21 Connection:

We will discuss the impact of BMS installations on a life-cycle cost basis. We will show how proper design on the front end will lead to life-cycle cost savings on the life of the facility. We will show how energy efficient mechanical design along with proven control algorithms can lead to a sustainable laboratory facility. The flexibility of the controls are key to the utilization of other technologies such as on-site generation, heat recovery, and load shifting.

We will also show how the commissioning process can be performed on a whole building which will lead to energy saving from operations and also decrease the CSV efforts on the installation side. In the end, through the effective use of HVAC control technology, the owner will have a facility that costs less to implement, will meet design criteria, and create energy savings throughout the life of the facility.

Biographies:

David Franczak is the president of EES. He has been with the company since 1990. During this time, he has developed and implemented many successful control schemes for chilled water plants and their associated loads. He has also provided validation services and documentation for HVAC and related systems for many pharmaceutical clients. As a project manager, Dave has worked on a variety of projects. Specific technical work has included hardware and software engineering in the design, implementation, commissioning and validation of HVAC control systems in critical and non-critical load applications.

David has developed internal processes at EES for standard documentation and project methodologies. His work in pharmaceutical applications and other regulatory projects has increased the level of quality and documentation throughout all facets of project execution.

Academic Background
BS Mechanical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Masters in Business Administration, Montclair State University

Professional Affiliations
Member, Control Systems Integrators Association
Member, New Jersey Association of Energy Engineers

Robert Rosa is a project manager at EES. He has been with the company since 1983. During this time, he has developed and implemented many successful control schemes for chilled water plants and their associated loads. As a project manager, Robert has worked on a variety of projects. Specific technical work has included hardware and software engineering in the design, implementation, commissioning and validation of HVAC control systems in critical and non-critical load applications.

Academic Background
BT Electrical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology

Professional Affiliations
Member, ISPE
Member, Labs21

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